or-bits.com presents UN-PUBLISH: OUTSOURCED at Banner Repeater

September 4th, 2013 | Posted by admin

or-bits.com presents UN-PUBLISH: OUTSOURCED at Banner Repeater with Tara Kelton, 14 September – 13 October 2013, PV 13 September 2013, 6pm to 9pm (coinciding with the Artists Books Weekend) and Prayas Abhinav of Museum of Vestigial Desire, 19 October – 17 October 2013, PV 18 October 2013, 6pm to 9pm

OUTSOURCED is a two-part exhibition project organised for Banner Repeater’s serial publication UN-PUBLISH.

Through presenting two consecutive solo projects by graphic designer/artist Tara Kelton and co-director of Museum of Vestigial Desire, Prayas Abhinav, UN-PUBLISH: OUTSOURCED explores the notion of outsourcing in its relationship with the users’ cultures and logics emerging from communicating through web-based services and online platforms.

Contributing to Banner Repeater’s: UN-PUBLISH serial publication, and in conjunction with the multiple modes of dissemination of artworks that Banner Repeater offers, such as free distribution of artists publications from the reading room and public space of Platform 1 at Hackney Downs rail station in London, Kelton and Abhinav have developed two new bodies of work to be experienced from different locations: at Banner Repeater project space, in the UN-PUBLISH publication 2.04 and 2.05 and at or-bits.com.

Part one:
KARIZMA by Tara Kelton
14 Sept – 13 Oct 2013; PV Friday 13 September 2013, 6 – 8:30pm
Opening in conjunction with the Artists Books Weekend.

Tara Kelton, Still Life 6, 2013; Still Lifes created by desktop publishing workers in Bangalore, India. Parameters given: create an 8" x 10" composition with 2 apples, 1 orange, 1 lemon, grapes, a plate, bowl, jug and glass.

Tara Kelton, Still Life 6, 2013; Still Lifes created by desktop publishing workers in Bangalore, India. Parameters given: create an 8″ x 10″ composition with 2 apples, 1 orange, 1 lemon, grapes, a plate, bowl, jug and glass.

Part two:
Museum of Vestigial Desire by its co-director Prayas Abhinav
19 Oct – 17 Nov 2013; PV Friday 18 October 2013, 6 – 8:30pm

Museum of Vestigial Desire, Lens, 2013

Museum of Vestigial Desire, Lens, 2013

<< In her film review of The Social Network (David Fincher, 2010), Zadie Smith despises Facebook’s normalcy as defined by its autistic computer-nerd founders. “Maybe the whole internet simply becomes like Facebook: falsely jolly, fake-friendly, self-promoting, sickly disingenuous.” Smith asks if we shouldn’t struggle against this pacification. “We were going to live online. It was going to be extraordinary. Yet, what kind of living is this? Step back from your Facebook Wall for a moment: Doesn’t it, suddenly, look a little ridiculous? ‘Your’ life in ‘this’ format?
Geert Lovink, Networks without a cause, 2011 Cambridge: Polity Press; p.41>>

More details about the project soon on or-bits.com and Banner Repeater website.

Where:
Banner Repeater
Platform 1, Hackney Downs railway station
Dalston Lane, London E8 1LA

> Forthcoming exhibition events at Banner Repeater:

Curators’ talk: or-bits.com and Banner Repeater in conversation
Sunday 6 October 2013, 2-3pm as part of Art Licks Weekend 2013
Ami Clarke of Banner Repeater and Marialaura Ghidini of or-bits.com will discuss the UN-PUBLISH programme and the development of this exhibition project.

Into Practice Book Sprint
Saturday 16 November 2013, 10am-5pm
Into Practice, a collective of UK-based artists, curators and researchers that exists to provide knowledge which facilitates practice, will organise a one-day Book Sprint exploring the themes of the exhibition with invited participants.

On the Upgrade – WYSIWYG Launch Events

July 22nd, 2013 | Posted by admin

On the Upgrade – WYSIWYG is a POD book, also distributed as a PDF, which includes artworks by Jamie Allen, Renee Carmichael, David Horvitz, IOCOSE, Michael Kargl, Sara Nunes Fernandes, Julia Tcharfas, Maria Theodoraki and Richard Sides along with interviews contextualising the artistic processes of the featured artists.
More details about the project can be found on the On the Upgrade page of our website.

The POD book was launched at The Northern Charter in Newcastle-upon-Tyne and at Banner Repeater in London in June 2013 .

Below  some images of the events:

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Reader at Banner Repeater, London

At Banner Repeater the event was accompanied by a conversation between ANDor-bits.com and Studio Hato: on modes of bridging online and offline publishing and distribution >

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or-bits.com, Studio Hato (Ken Kirton) and AND (Eva Weinmayr) in conversation

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or-bits.com, Studio Hato (Ken Kirton) and AND (Eva Weinmayr) in conversation

Jamie Allen‘s  Fluxus Score for Google Chat & Browser, ‘Sounding the Alarm with a Muted Bell’, with Addie Wagenknecht (Austria), Alexander Shakhovskoy (Russia), Inbal Lieblich (Israel), Jeff Crouse (USA), Lorah Pierre (United Kingdom), Michael Chiaramonte (USA) >

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Jamie Allen, ‘Sounding the Alarm with a Muted Bell’, a Fluxus Score for Google Chat & Browser; instructions

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Jamie Allen, ‘Sounding the Alarm with a Muted Bell’, a Fluxus Score for Google Chat & Browser; screen view of the viewer at Banner Repeater.

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Jamie Allen, ‘Sounding the Alarm with a Muted Bell’, a Fluxus Score for Google Chat & Browser; screengrab

Sara Nunes Fernandes‘ reading of ‘The Sideways boy and the levitating granny, the frontal man and the backside woman, the upside-down man and his wife who had her feet on the ground.

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Sara Nunes Fernandes, ‘The Sideways boy and the levitating granny, the frontal man and the backside woman, the upside-down man and his wife who had her feet on the ground’; reading

At The Norther Charter, the scheduled talk with Ralf Brög from SITE magazine was cancelled at the last minute. Instead, there was a lively conversation with the participants and the TNC studio holders.

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Conversation after presentation and display of sound works previously produced for ‘128kbps objects’ which are included in ‘On the Upgrade WYSIWYG’

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Partecipants at The Northern Charter

What are the representational languages of the interface? How does it work as text, image, sound, space and so forth, and what are the cultural effects, for instance of the way it reconfigures the visual, textual or auditory?” Soren Pold in Interface Realism: The Interface as Aesthetic Form, 2005

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Reading Room at Banner Repeater

On the Upgrade WYSIWYG is available for purchase on Lulu.com, AND shop and at their kiosks, at Banner Repeater and selected bookshops.

Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

On the Upgrade – WYSIWYG + Book Launch events in June 2013

May 30th, 2013 | Posted by admin

We are pleased to present On the Upgrade – WYSIWYG, a new or-bits.com publishing project.

On the Upgrade – WYSIWYG is a POD book, also distributed as a PDF, which includes artworks by Jamie Allen, Renee Carmichael, David Horvitz, IOCOSE, Michael Kargl, Sara Nunes Fernandes, Julia Tcharfas, Maria Theodoraki and Richard Sides along with interviews contextualising the artistic processes of the featured artists.

On the Upgrade – WYSIWYG
is a book exhibition, or an exhibition in a book. It is a new configuration of selected material that was firstly presented online or for web broadcast and operates as an artistic, curatorial and design re-alignment of material originally compiled for online consumption for the book interface. The starting point of this project was that of conceiving the book format as an interface and reflecting upon the tensions that might exist between this holdable interface and the web interface along with that of the computer. Thereby reading patterns, the specificity of engagement with the material presented in a book and what site-specificity might mean in relation to moving between online and offline modes of presentation are some of the aspects that have been considered at the time of the making of the book.

What are the representational languages of the interface? How does it work as text, image, sound, space and so forth, and what are the cultural effects, for instance of the way it reconfigures the visual, textual or auditory?” From Soren Pold, Interface Realism: The Interface as Aesthetic Form, 2005

We are holding two EVENTS to launch the project:

Wednesday 26 June 2013, 6:30 – 8:30pm
at The Northern Charter, Newcastle-upon-Tyne;
With a conversation between Ralf Brög (SITE magazine), Marialaura Ghidini (or-bits.com) and Sam Watson (CIRCA Projects) about intermedia publishing, and more.
Book a free place here, http://orbitsbooklaunch.eventbrite.co.uk/#
http://thenortherncharter.org/

Friday 28 June 2013, 6:30 – 8:30pm
at Banner Repeater, London;
With: AND, or-bits.com and Studio Hato in conversation: on modes of bridging online and offline publishing and distribution (6:45PM)> Jamie Allen‘s a Fluxus Score for Google Chat & Browser, ‘Sounding the Alarm with a Muted Bell’ (7:30PM)>Sara Nunes Fernandes‘ reading of ‘The Sideways boy and the levitating granny, the frontal man and the backside woman, the upside-down man and his wife who had her feet on the ground’ (8PM)
http://www.bannerrepeater.org/

On the Upgrade – WYSIWYG is available as a POD book and PDF on Lulu.com, our website and selected online distributors and bookshops. More info on our website, http://www.or-bits.com/editions.php

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The design of On the Upgrade – WYSIWYG is by Studio Hato, London

On the Upgrade
is the publishing series of or-bits.com that explores the relationship between artistic production and distribution online and print publishing. The projects within the series look at processes of translation of artistic material which, originally created for a website, migrate to a different site, taking up different forms and formats, in print. On the Upgrade considers the possibilities, limitations and characteristics inherent in the movement between sites of creation, display, dissemination and engagement in relation to the increasingly broader notion of publishing. It also functions as an offline archive of material and artworks firstly presented on or-bits.com that, with each new project, respond to the site-specificity of the chosen print format, a format conceived as an expansion of the original site of display, its source (our website). On the Upgrade started in September 2011 within or-bits.com off-site activities such as gallery exhibitions, events and workshops.

A Talk at The Centre for Internet and Society

April 15th, 2013 | Posted by admin

A presentation of or-bits.com’s activities in conjunction with Marialaura Ghidini’s residency at T.A.J./SKE Projects in Bangalore, India, 19 April 2013, 6pm

For more information go here.

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Together or Alone

March 25th, 2013 | Posted by Sarah Jury

I will never know where you are while I write this, or where you are while you read it. Do you sit alone like me; feet tucked under a folded-down duvet, clothed in soft jersey – a Sunday-morning-style of working-from-home? In my last post I mentioned the anonymity of the screen in the room; the secrecy of the users gaze. Since, I’ve been researching aloneness and sociability.

Contemporary working methodologies include “think groups” and “ break-out areas” and are concerned with game theory; collaboration has become a strategy as well as an art practice. Within artist-run studios and post-studio practices collectives share tasks and ideas to mutual benefit, but where does leave the introvert who works best alone; what of the Anachorites, when idiorrhythmia calls?

Sloterdijk writes ‘Psychologist-philosophers of the early Modern ages had made it clear that the interpersonal space was overcrowded with symbiotic, erotic and mimetic-competitive energies that fundamentally deny the illusion of subject autonomy.’ [Sloterdijk, Peter, Bubbles (Semiotext(e) 2007) pp.207.] Philosopher Wittgenstein suffered from this lack of ‘subject autonomy’ and noted that he could only think clearly when outside the academy; away from other academics and institutions. He retreated to Norway:

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Wittegenstein’s cabin in Skjolden, Norway

 

Where could I find this isolated place now? I ask this question while alone in my room I have conversations popping up as texts and Tweets on my phone, as emails and Google chats pop up on my laptop screen. I have Facebook and Skype set to “invisible” and am contemplating downloading ‘Freedom’, one of the study aids that block your computer from receiving the internet for a pre-set time:

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‘Freedom’ – when did the internet become something we needed ‘freedom’ from?

When I do retreat to a rural heaven, I take my computer and can’t help but to key in the Wi-Fi code, and therefor continue to be connected to the very same international network. Unlike the many classic literary gents (T.S. Elliot who finished The Wasteland while on retreat in Margate, Orwell who wrote Nineteen Eighty-Four on the Scottish island of Jura), wherever I go my position on the network remains un-removed. I question how the relevance of location has changed since we are constantly surrounded with this same network of peers and information; plugged into the same Gmail program, the retreating artist must go further, to “get away”. For those accessing this blog post, total removal from “the” globalized society, is an extreme action and quite difficult to come by.
When listening to the narrative of any of Oliver Laric’s Versions film works, the infinity of content online is brought to my attention through his narrative essay. Since information on the internet is infinitely duplicated and is expanding in all directions, the source of the information becomes untraceable, and eventually, irrelevant. Information is removed from its original context as soon as it becomes digitally accessible, this philosophy could be carried across to our own geographical location. The geographical setting of origin becomes unimportant if the digital network, the same network that we access every day and the traveler, easily accesses everywhere. It doesn’t matter where we are. Perhaps when the 20% of us who are served by telecommunication found “Globalization”, lost original context.

What becomes of the introvert who traveled to find solitude, does he/she now have nowhere to retreat to, or does this person find a new, intermediary space? Shyness becomes less compromising now that popular digital communications provide a regular mode through which to communicate, protected by one sort of visor (screen/ keyboard/ microphone) or another.

The idea of Anonymous is that you’re fucking alone until you get to 4chan, and all these people think like you, and then all of a sudden you’re not alone, you’re with 500 others, they all know the same jokes and the same interests as you, “here is your culture”, you meet you’re own people, finally. [Mike Vitale, friend of Anonymous during Project Chanology.]

The rise in digital collaborative forums such as Anonymous, Reddit, 4Chan, server lists, reduce the social handicap that the introvert has been dealt with in the past allowing a guise through which to effortlessly access a peer group. Looking for similar social interaction stay at home mothers founded netmom and adolescent pre-teens divulge their most intimate concerns to group feedback on the comments pages of  Wikihow and Teenspot.
“Girly chat” is not really the same though is it – when it’s limited to anonymity and removed from your girlfriends. Gregg Housh, internet activist associated with Anonymous, joked about Anonymous’s members ‘who are not socially good, they still live at home at 23 and half of them virgins,’ and in the 2013 Storyville BBC documentary How Hackers Changed the World: We Are Legion went on to divulge that a number of them admitted to ‘getting laid’ at the first physical gathering during the scientology protests of 2008. My point here is something about the importance of physical interaction, even the platonic kind. Questioning the effects of the impossibility of it on the internet, and how that’s effecting online communication.

I have a colleague who’s obsessed with ASMR (Auto Sensory Meridian Response):

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The strange ASMR YouTube videos of people folding towels, stoking their faces with soft brushes or applying make-up are made by people who have found that watching these videos provokes a ‘tingling feeling which begins around the scalp and can often travel all around the body particularly down the back and into the persons arms and legs’ [http://www.asmr.co.uk/]. The draw is relaxation not sexual pleasure, but, maybe like porn, the visual sequences broadcast physical sensation through the screen. Having spoken about concerns of physically reductive online social-lives, to find this group of people who’s brains have developed to experience this ‘tingling sensation’ on the body without physical touch, crosses one of the limits of the screen.

ASMR is a very new fad, it is not yet scientifically researched as far as I can see but physical stimulus has been a heavily researched as a psychological effector, since the beginnings of erotology. This ancient and continually existing study is dedicated to physical stimuli and sexual behaviors and subjects long biography quantifies it’s own psychological importance.

Magnetosophical theory is a development of erotology, towards platonic physical stimulus, and has been researched by philosophers, anthropologists and psychoanalysts including Plato and Freud.  Magnetosphy addresses intersubjective intimate space and argues that our bodies are imbued with magnetic forces that, like planets in the cosmos, respond to each other – are drawn to each other. In the previously mentioned book Bubbles Sloterdijk evaluates every type of human-to-human intimacy including the magnetosphical, to claim that intellectual connections entail physical proximity, to grasp ‘the uppermost heights of cognition’. If indeed the ‘magnetic fields’ coming from another’s body really can take our thoughts to otherwise un reached places, this would reaffirm why working collaborations, which are played out face-to-face, are a vital method of practice.

Without the possibility for this physical interaction, can message boards, server lists and forums ever attain to similar qualities as face-to-face communication? Skype might take us closer to physical togetherness but the “magnetism” between two bodies is still voided through the disjunction of the screen. ASMR only serves to relax the viewer, and so far hasn’t expanded to look at the possible transmission of physical connection within two-way social communication. Are what we gain from almost always being connected, and a shyness-sensitive inclusiveness, worth the sacrifice of physical-social interaction? One risk is that the shield of the anonymity of the screen leaves users more reckless, but one benefit is that it distributes more voices to be heard, and therefore attains to a greater and more unilaterally satisfied community voice.